Relationships Take Maturity – Here’s How to Handle Conflicts


Our childhood years are pivotal moments. This is the time when we’re introduced to love and relationships. Typically starting with our parents and trickling down to siblings and other relatives in our family. I learned the effects of childhood relationships during my undergraduate years when I majored in psychology. Interactions with parents and people close to us affect us in so many ways. For example an only child may prefer more personal space than a child who has multiple siblings. A person who raised by a single parent may have different perspectives on relationships compared to someone brought up in a two-parent household. It takes insight to understand that some childhood upbringing may not be the best to carry on into adulthood, especially when it affects future relationships.

Not everyone is taught how to love. Some people go through life not knowing what love truly means.

Generations love differently, just think about it. ¬†Babyboomers being born between 1946-1964 and experience different opportunities during childhood. Some went to college to further their education while others worked good-paying jobs right out of high school, working their way up to CEO status or high management positions. Whether they further their education or not, some people in that generation were known to live in households with unstable relationships. Men would marry and have other families causing friction in the household. Wives who invested into their spouse didn’t have the strength or finances to leave due to their husband being the breadwinner. They practically called the shots and if they were caught with another woman it was brushed off. Can you imagine what love was like in a household like that? Now granted there are some women who may live like that even today, but back in those days, it was the norm. Continue reading “Relationships Take Maturity – Here’s How to Handle Conflicts”