5 Reason Vacations are Crucial for your Mental Health

Every day we report to work and focus on what we need to do in order to succeed in our careers. We schedule appointments, meet deadlines, and fry our brains for hours at a time. We do this daily resulting in stress, self-doubt, and frustration. We get flustered, forget things, and sometimes take shortcuts instead of completing assignments the right way. We’ve all been there, that’s why this blog post is critical. It hits home for a lot of people who work and need a break from life. It’s important to give our minds a rest, as a matter of fact, it should be a requirement.

I know people that run off of energy drinks, works two or three jobs for years at a time and have no idea what it means to take a vacation. These people can be grumpy, lose insight on their goals, and forget their purpose in life, all because they don’t take a break from work. Taking our mind and body away from our work space does a lot for our mental health. Everyone should take a vacation at least once a year. If you can squeeze in two vacations per year that’s great, and if you can go more than twice a year, you’re doing better than most Americans! I conducted some research and read that thirty-five percent of Americans will take a vacation this year, are you a part of that 35 percent?

In May, I went on a cruise. This was my first time cruising and I must say I enjoyed the experience. The hubby and I met people from different parts of the world, and I visited some cool islands all within seven days. It was nice, well needed, and made me sad when it was time to return home.

Travel Agent Central Stats: 35 Percent of
Americans to Take Family Vacations This Year – by Newsdeck 

Continue reading “5 Reason Vacations are Crucial for your Mental Health”

How Psychiatric Rehabilitation Programs Help with Mental Health

New patients admitted into a psychiatric facility sometimes struggle with understanding the process of being in a hospital. Many
living-room-728731_1920patients think they are okay after taking a dose of medications, and participating in two or three mental health groups. It’s common to hear patients say: It was a mistake, I wasn’t really going to hurt myself, or I don’t need to be here. However, when someone is reluctant to obtain treatment, it becomes difficult to educate them about mental health. Patients meet with a psychiatrist and other mental health professions while at an inpatient psychiatric hospital. During their inpatient stay, they will learn about coping skills, positive thinking skills, recreational skills, and have the ability to express their stressors and how to manage them. Patients are estimated to stay on an inpatient unit for seven to fourteen days. This is short compared to how long patients stayed in psychiatric hospitals decades ago. However, upon discharge, patients receive resources that will help them with treatment on a different level of care. Ongoing treatment typically is long term and helps patients process their mental health issues outside of a hospital setting.

There are programs across Maryland that assist patients with daily living skills. These skills can range from simple task like getting dressed, to difficult task like locating a job or identifying triggers. Patients discharged from an inpatient facility or have a difficult time with stressors in life, may be referred to a Psychiatric Rehabilitation Program (PRP). These programs give patients emotional and intellectual structure that is required to improve in their day-to-day living skills.

Some individuals live by themselves and have little to no family support. Families who are supportive, are not always available to provide a person what they need to manage their mental illness.  When clients are in a PRP, families have a sense of security knowing their loved one is learning the necessary tools to control their mental illness. Here are a few things that are structured at a PRP: Continue reading “How Psychiatric Rehabilitation Programs Help with Mental Health”